Lehigh Valley Planning Commission

LEHIGH VALLEY COMMUNITIES BECOMING MORE RESILIENT - July 2018

Matt Assad, Managing Editor

Some communities intend to remove or relocate structures that have been repeatedly flooded, some will seek back-up generators to keep essential services running during blackouts, and many are taking steps to keep residents from dying from drug overdose.

The Lehigh Valley Hazard Mitigation Plan is designed to help communities from across the region prepare for disasters such as hurricanes, floods and the drug overdose crisis. The concept behind the Plan is simple: save lives and prevent property loss by preparing for disaster before it hits.

A working copy of the 2018 Plan is now available for public review at LVPC.org/hazard-mitigation.html, and two public meetings to discuss the working draft are scheduled for Tuesday, July 10. A noon Planning and Pizza session at the LVPC offices and a second meeting at 7 p.m. at the Catasauqua Municipal Building will give people a chance to comment on the draft. The plan remains in a 30-day public comment period through August 1.

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LEHIGH VALLEY RESIDENTS VALUE OPEN SPACE - July 2018

Matt Assad, Managing Editor

Lehigh Valley residents may live here to be close to family or work or urban areas like New York City, but they stay here because of its rural and open space character.

In our first regionwide survey in four years, 61% of residents surveyed said what they like most about living in the Lehigh Valley is its parks, trails and recreation activities. Running a close second, at 59%, is the region’s natural lands and farmlands.

“It really ties into what people see as the identity of the Valley, and their anxiety about what’s potentially being lost in this new economy,” said LVPC Principal Community Planner John von Kerczek.

Administered by the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission (LVPC) and taken by nearly 1,200 people, our first Valleywide survey since 2014 has provided vital information that can be used as the LVPC drafts a new plan for the region.

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FREIGHT SUMMIT TACKLES CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES - July 2018

Matt Assad, Managing Editor

More freight through the region means more jobs, more businesses and more tax base.

More freight through the region means more trucks, more warehouses and more traffic.

Finding a way to balance those conflicting impacts was the mission of some of the nation’s top planning, government and industry experts as they gathered among 230 attendees last week at the first Eastern Pennsylvania Freight Summit, at Lehigh University’s Iacocca Hall.

As e-commerce and two-day delivery has helped make the Lehigh Valley the fastest-growing freight corridor in the country, PennDOT Secretary Leslie Richard led a daylong discussion that laid out the freight road ahead, and debated how to keep it from going off course. After explaining that the Lehigh Valley’s location within reach of 80 million consumers makes it’s one of the busiest freight corridors, she quickly got to the central question of the day.

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Lehigh Valley Planning Commission

961 Marcon Boulevard - Suite 310

Allentown, PA 18109

Phone: (610) 264-4544

Toll Free: (888) 627-8808

Fax: (610) 264-2616