The Lehigh Valley's Data Source

TRANSPORTATION

Much like weather and air quality, transportation impacts virtually everyone. You don’t have to own a car to be frustrated by congestion or exhilarated by the beauty of a scenic trail. And in the Lehigh Valley, you can get your fill of both, whether it be on the 90,000 vehicle-per-day Route 22 or a D&L Trail that snakes through 21 municipalities in Lehigh and Northampton counties.

Traffic congestion in the Lehigh Valley is defined as high-density traffic flow in which speed and freedom to maneuver are severely restricted, and comfort and convenience have declined, even though flow remains stable.

Frequent vehicle crashes are a contributing factor in creating traffic congestion. The Lehigh Valley in 2016 experienced 168 major injuries and 61 fatalities. Infrastructure improvements to mitigate high crash corridors, as well as continued driver, cyclist and pedestrian education to improve traveling behavior, remain a focus of regional transportation planning efforts.

Navigating the Lehigh Valley

More than 100,000 residents commute outside the Lehigh Valley for work each day, contributing to an average daily commute time of 26 minutes region-wide. Northampton County residents, on average, have a slightly longer commute time than their neighbors in Lehigh County, largely because a higher percentage of them are traveling eastward along high-volume roads, such as Route 22 and Interstate 78, to the more metropolitan areas of New Jersey and New York City.

Alternative Modes of Transportation

The Lehigh Valley has a robust and growing trail network comprised of larger paths such as the D&L Trail, to smaller community trails, such as the Ironton Rail Trail or Karl Stirner Arts Trail. With more than 460 miles of land and water trails in place, community leaders expect to bolster that by building new trails and closing gaps in the existing system to provide a more seamless network for recreation and commuting.

LANTA operates the LANtaBus system, a network of 30 fixed bus routes throughout the Lehigh Valley, providing daily, later evening, Saturday and Sunday services. It also operates the LANtaVan system, which provides special door-to-door transportation services for people with disabilities and the elderly who cannot use the LANtaBus system.

Roads and Bridges

Maintaining the region’s bridges is essential for mobility. Closed and weight-restricted bridges result in detours and increased travel times.

Bridges classified as structurally deficient exhibit deterioration to one or more of its major components. In this region, higher order roads, such as interstates, have the fewest structurally deficient bridges, while lower order local roads have the most.

The plan to build and maintain the region’s roads and bridges, and operate its mass transit system, is known as the Transportation Improvement Program. In 2017, a total investment of $28 million for highway projects, $46 million for bridge projects and $34 million for transit projects was programmed as part of a four-year, $458 million program that runs through 2020. These investments help to maintain the current infrastructure, while building new projects to meet the demands of increasing traffic volumes. The Lehigh Valley Transportation Study, supported by the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission, is the transportation investment planning arm for the region.

Freight

The Lehigh Valley’s location within a single-day’s truck delivery to more than one-third of all U.S. consumers has made it an attractive location for distribution centers that bring freight into the Valley. Expected growth in freight traffic will force planners to invest in the road network, while working to minimize the impacts to the overall quality of life in the region.

Photo courtesy of Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority

2016 Passengers Metric Tons of Freight 688,505 57,131

Air

The Lehigh Valley International Airport is one of three airports in the region, but the only one providing both passenger air service and air freight service. LVIA served nearly 700,000 passengers in 2016 and has become a major air freight hub for Amazon.com and Federal Express.

Two other airports, Braden Airpark and Queen City Airport, specialize in general aviation, serving as base to more than 130 small planes.